Church Innovations’ Partners Post

January 19, 2009

Filed under: Bremer Partnership — ptellison @ 12:02 pm

Welcome to the Bremer Project  Blog!

#2

 

In addition to the two self-study groups we talked about last week, there is a very important third group:

The Growing Healthier Congregations group who learned the method for spiritual discernment of tough issues. This process includes dwelling in Philippians, acknowledging the difficulties of taking on tough subjects, doing a brainstorm on the topic from three vantage points, and having a floated conversation.

 

Your group spent the better part of a day learning, practicing, and troubleshooting this process.  The group was fairly positive as they left that afternoon. But what has come of it?  Here are a couple of questions:

 

  1. Have you figured out a couple of easy questions to try it out on, just for practice?
  2. Who will do the practice sessions? The church council or board? A committee? And who will lead them through that meeting?
  3. If you’ve already done one, what happened?
  4. If you haven’t done one yet, do you have some questions before you try it out? Ask them here!

 

That’s it for now.

Peace.  Pat

2 Comments »

  1. Some reflections on practicing GHC not necessarily related to the questions above:

    One of the things I realized in our last training day with GHC is how difficult it can be to keep the “God” part of the question as central to the floated conversation. It seems as though our problem-solving-impulses (how American is that?) seem to take over and we rush to the business of talking about what technique or technology will solve our problem. This is perhaps the fact-value split all over again.

    Comment by scott.hagley — January 22, 2009 @ 3:43 pm

  2. And of course we want to solve problems as effectively and efficiently as possible. Especially if they mean something – are really bothering us. Even church groups go first to seeking betters ways forward and don’t sit in the problem and ask one another, in the presence of one another, not just at 4 AM when the problem wakes them up and they’re all alone, “What might God be up to here?”
    Why is that?

    Comment by Pat Ellison — January 22, 2009 @ 4:02 pm

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